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Pancake Recipe: Wheat-Free Pancakes and Waffles

More and more people are concerned about food allergies and celiac disease. But we've noticed that many gluten-free pancake and waffle mixes have a dry and powdery texture and just don't taste the way we expect pancakes to taste. We think we've solved that problem with this pancake recipe for oatmeal pancakes—a recipe that works nicely for waffles, too.

These wheat-free pancakes make sense as part of a diet to relieve PMS symptoms and even prevent PMS symptoms: they don't contain wheat, a major food allergen, and can be made gluten-free. They are a good source of protein to help balance blood sugar, especially when sweetened with fruit and stevia rather than sugary syrups; and they're made with wholegrain oatmeal, a good source of fiber

While oats may not always be gluten free, you may use gluten-free oats when preparing this pancake recipe for people with celiac disease, gluten intolerance, or who are following a gluten-free diet. Many people who are sensitive to gluten are able to eat high quality oats that are certified free of gluten contamination.

These are easy and fun to prepare, and they're delicious. We hope this pancake recipe becomes a breakfast and snack standby for you (and your family), as it has for us and our families.

Preparation Time: 20 minutes prep time, 20 minutes cooking time

Serves: Makes 6-8 medium pancakes

Wheat-Free Pancakes

Ingredients: 
1 cup quick oats or old fashioned oatmeal
3/4 cup 1% milk (organic if available)
3/4 cup water
2 eggs
1 T safflower, sunflower, or canola oil
1/8 t salt
Oil or butter for skillet; or, cook in non-stick pan

Directions:
Cook the oatmeal in the milk and water. For convenience and ease of preparation, cook in a large mixing bowl on high in a microwave for 60 seconds, keeping a watchful eye to prevent boiling over. If there is still liquid in bowl after 60 seconds, cook for another 30 seconds. Alternately, bring oatmeal, water, and milk to a boil, then turn to simmer and cook for five minutes or until oats have completely absorbed liquid; then, pour cooked oatmeal into mixing bowl.

Fold in eggs, oil, and salt. Mix thoroughly, then pour pancake batter to desired size and shape in skillet. Unlike ordinary pancake batter, these oatmeal pancakes won't bubble when they are ready to flip, but the top will dry out a little. You can also flip the edge of pancake and check that the bottom is golden brown.

They are done when both sides are golden brown. The second side of the pancake takes less time to cook since the batter is already hot.

We recommend serving these with only a very small amount of real maple syrup and butter. You can also skip the fat and sugar, and enjoy them with a dollop or more of nonfat plain yogurt, sliced fruit or berries, half a stevia packet, and even a dash of cinnamon.

To make waffles, use two tablespoons of oil, and use the beaten egg white variation from above.

Notes:
Because of variations in the heat of your stove, the way your microwave cooks, the skillet you use, and the size of the eggs, as well as individual preferences, you may have to try this recipe more than once to get the ratios of oats to liquid and eggs just right for your kitchen and your palate. We think these taste perfect when they are moist and delicate on the inside but crispy and golden brown outside.

Variations:
For richer and moister pancakes, use three eggs instead of two.
Adding second tablespoon of oil will make a moister pancake.
Serve with a scoop of non-fat plain yogurt or cottage cheese for an extra helping of protein and to boost the calcium content.
Season with powdered cinnamon, cardamom, or ginger for an exotic accent.
Serve with fruit as you would with any pancake; or layer top of pancake with blueberries or sliced strawberries, bananas, or peaches before flipping. This will make a messier yet moister pancake.
Many breakfast connoisseurs insist that the only way to make a pancake is to separate the eggs; fold the yolk into the batter; beat the egg whites until stiff; and then fold the beaten egg whites into the batter immediately before putting on the skillet.
Use 1/2 cup oatmeal and 1/2 cup oat bran instead of 1 cup oatmeal to make a higher-fiber recipe.

If you decide to try these as a snack, refrigerate them after making them and then toast them, and serve them with peanut or almond butter.

Benefits:
Whole grain oats are a great source of protein and fiber, and eggs are an excellent protein. These pancakes are a great replacement for breakfast items that are high in refined carbohydrates and sugar.

Real, Natural Relief—So You Can Feel Great All Month Long

PMS and PMDD misery aren't always taken seriously enough by doctors, family, and friends. At PMS Comfort, our whole purpose is to empower and educate you about premenstrual symptoms, and to provide real, natural relief so that you can feel great all month long. Our all-natural doctor-designed programs are based on decades of experience helping thousands of women recover from what you've been going through. Our Herbal Relief formula, when combined with our diet and lifestyle guidance, addresses more than just your symptoms—it can help bring your body and mind back into balance, and help you get and stay healthy. Plus, we're here to support you, every step of the way.

To learn more about your PMS and PMDD symptoms, take the PMS Comfort quiz. Or, start feeling better today, for as little as 89 cents per day.

We want to help. Give us a call at 1-800-731-6327, drop us an e-mail, or send us your question.

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Principal Author: Daniel J. Heller, N.D.
Last Modified: January 9, 2012

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